https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/issue/feed The European Journal of Humour Research 2024-06-26T15:07:34+02:00 The Editorial Team ejhr@europeanjournalofhumour.org Open Journal Systems <p>The EJHR is an open-access, academic journal published by <a title="Tertium" href="https://tertium.edu.pl/en/"><strong>Cracow Tertium Society for the Promotion of Language Studies</strong> </a>and endorsed by <a href="http://www.humorstudies.org/">The International Society for Humor Studies (ISHS)</a>. The EJHR publishes full research articles, shorter commentaries, which discuss ground-breaking or controversial areas, research notes, which provide details on the research project rationale, methodology and outcomes, as well as book reviews. The journal has a special focus on supporting PhD students and early career researchers by providing them with a forum within which to disseminate their work alongside established scholars and practitioners.</p> <p>The EJHR welcomes submissions that combine research and relevant applications as well as empirical studies detailing their usefulness to the study of humour. All contributions received (apart from book reviews) undergo a double-blind, peer-review process. In addition to established scholars within humor research, we invite those as yet unfamiliar with (or wary of) humor research to enter the discussion, especially based on less known or less covered material. The elaboration of joint methodological frameworks is strongly encouraged. For further details or inquiries you may contact the Editors.</p> <p>No charges are applied either for submitting, reviewing or processing articles for publication. </p> <p>The journal is now listed in important international <a href="https://www.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/Indexing">indexing bases</a> including <a href="https://www.scopus.com/sourceid/21100838187?origin=sbrowse">Scopus</a> and Scimago ranking :</p> <p> </p> <p><a title="SCImago Journal &amp; Country Rank" href="https://www.scimagojr.com/journalsearch.php?q=21100838187&amp;tip=sid&amp;exact=no"><img src="https://www.scimagojr.com/journal_img.php?id=21100838187" alt="SCImago Journal &amp; Country Rank" border="0" /></a> </p> <p>CiteScore for Cultural Studies 2023:</p> <p><a href="https://europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/management/settings/&lt;a href=&quot;https:/www.scopus.com/sourceid/21100838187?dgcid=sc_widget_citescore&quot; style=&quot;text-decoration:none;color:#505050&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;height:100px;width:180px;font-family:Arial, Verdana, helvetica, sans-serif;background-color:#ffffff;display:inline-block&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;padding: 0px 16px;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;padding-top:3px;line-height:1;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;float:left;font-size:28px&quot;&gt;&lt;span id=&quot;citescoreVal&quot; style=&quot;letter-spacing: -2px;display: inline-block;padding-top: 7px;line-height: .75;&quot;&gt;1.1&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;float:right;font-size:14px;padding-top:3px;text-align: right;&quot;&gt;&lt;span id=&quot;citescoreYearVal&quot; style=&quot;display:block;&quot;&gt;2023&lt;/span&gt;CiteScore&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;clear:both;&quot;&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;padding-top:3px;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;height:4px;background-color:#DCDCDC;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;height:4px;background-color:#007398;&quot; id=&quot;percentActBar&quot;&gt;&amp;nbsp;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;font-size:11px;&quot;&gt;&lt;span id=&quot;citescorePerVal&quot;&gt;75th percentile&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;font-size:12px;text-align:right;&quot;&gt;Powered by &amp;nbsp;&lt;span&gt;&lt;img alt=&quot;Scopus&quot; style=&quot;width:50px;height:15px;&quot; src=&quot;https://www.scopus.com/static/images/scopusLogoOrange.svg&quot;&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;/a&gt;"><img src="https://europeanjournalofhumour.org/public/site/images/wchlopicki/citescore2023-european-journal-of-.png" alt="" width="180" height="100" /></a></p> <p>CiteScore for Language and Linguistics 2023:</p> <p><a href="https://europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/management/settings/&lt;a href=&quot;https:/www.scopus.com/sourceid/21100838187?dgcid=sc_widget_citescore&quot; style=&quot;text-decoration:none;color:#505050&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;height:100px;width:180px;font-family:Arial, Verdana, helvetica, sans-serif;background-color:#ffffff;display:inline-block&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;padding: 0px 16px;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;padding-top:3px;line-height:1;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;float:left;font-size:28px&quot;&gt;&lt;span id=&quot;citescoreVal&quot; style=&quot;letter-spacing: -2px;display: inline-block;padding-top: 7px;line-height: .75;&quot;&gt;1.1&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;float:right;font-size:14px;padding-top:3px;text-align: right;&quot;&gt;&lt;span id=&quot;citescoreYearVal&quot; style=&quot;display:block;&quot;&gt;2023&lt;/span&gt;CiteScore&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;clear:both;&quot;&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;padding-top:3px;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;height:4px;background-color:#DCDCDC;&quot;&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;height:4px;background-color:#007398;&quot; id=&quot;percentActBar&quot;&gt;&amp;nbsp;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;font-size:11px;&quot;&gt;&lt;span id=&quot;citescorePerVal&quot;&gt;75th percentile&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;div style=&quot;font-size:12px;text-align:right;&quot;&gt;Powered by &amp;nbsp;&lt;span&gt;&lt;img alt=&quot;Scopus&quot; style=&quot;width:50px;height:15px;&quot; src=&quot;https://www.scopus.com/static/images/scopusLogoOrange.svg&quot;&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;/a&gt;"><img src="https://europeanjournalofhumour.org/public/site/images/wchlopicki/blobid0.png" alt="" /></a></p> <p>This publication is supported by the <a href="https://www.folklore.ee/CEES/index_eng.php">CEES</a> and ELM <a href="http://www.folklore.ee/kirjastus/eth/">Scholarly Press.</a></p> <p><img src="https://server674212.nazwa.pl/ejhr-ojs/public/site/images/mklag/cees-transparent-short-logo-11-smaller.png" alt="" width="180" height="71" /> <img src="https://server674212.nazwa.pl/ejhr-ojs/public/site/images/mklag/eesti-kirjandusmuuseum-logod-rgb-must-est-63rida-smaller.png" alt="" width="180" height="81" /></p> https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/879 The collective and individual expressions of humour in social media spaces 2024-06-26T15:07:21+02:00 Yousef Barahmeh yousef.barahmeh1@gmail.com <p><em>This article seeks to establish a theoretical framework for considering how the collective and individual expressions of humour in social media spaces have been used and presented in the socio-political context of Jordan after the 2011 Arab Spring. This framework moves from the collective to the individual and makes Mikhail Bakhtin and Sigmund Freud complementary to the study of Jordanian social media humour after the Arab Spring. It argues that Mikhail Bakhtin’s theories of carnival and the carnivalesque (folk humour) have a functional similarity to Sigmund Freud’s theory of humour (release theory) because both seem to agree on the role of repression to influence the production of humour. Although repression is being understood differently (for Bakhtin it is political repression, which is usually a conscious decision, while for Freud it is self-repression, which is usually unconscious), humour can provide us with a strong mechanism for overcoming repression, or at least, giving the individual or the crowd the impression that they are challenging repression without necessarily challenging the status quo i.e., calling for regime change or revolution. </em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/869 Caricatures as propaganda weapons during the First World War 2024-06-26T15:07:24+02:00 Ágnes Tamás tagnes83@yahoo.com <p><em>This study examines a specific segment of visual propaganda from the First World War, the caricatures of comic papers (German: Kladderadatsch; Austrian: Figaro, Kikieriki, Wiener Caricaturen and Die Muskete; Hungarian: Borsszem Jankó and Mátyás Diák). It focuses on the visual tools used by cartoonists to depict the enemy, how they employed visual propaganda, and whether this met the criteria of effective propaganda. By way of comparison, it also briefly discusses some elements of the self-image. The symbols of the First World War cartoons still closely followed 19th century trends: cartoonists commented on the events of the war by depicting and exaggerating ancient myths, biblical stories, women representing countries and men and animals representing nations. This study will attempt a systematic analysis of these motifs and symbols.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/756 The language of Nigerian stand-up comedy 2024-06-26T15:07:31+02:00 Emama Emmanuel Ogheneakpobor emama73@gmail.com Macaulay Mowarin mamowarin@yahoo.co.uk <p><em>Nigeria is complexly multilingual. Arising from this, Nigerian stand–up comedians employ a variety of linguistic strategies to communicate with the audience. This research investigates the peculiarities of language use in Nigerian stand-up comedy by analysing patterns of code choices in the comic performances of four comedians. Because the stand-up comedy industry is predominant in the Southern part of Nigeria, the comedians chosen for this study are representative of the three geopolitical zones of southern Nigeria. The analysis of the data indicates that (1) although Nigerian stand-up comedians primarily use Nigerian Pidgin (NP) they also employ language alternation and code-switch between NP, English, and a variety of indigenous languages. (2) NP is mainly used in the oral medium. Consequently, features of orality: repetition, parallel structures, anaphora, lexical cushioning, semantic extension, metaphor imagery, sentence fragments, and rhetorical devices, are other dominant features of Nigerian stand-up comedy.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/843 Pragmatic acts of humour in family discourse in selected Maryam Apaokagi's comedy skits 2024-06-26T15:07:29+02:00 Ayo Osisanwo ayosisanwo@gmail.com Lekan Atoloye lekanatoloye@gmail.com Seun Akintaro akintaroseun95@gmail.com <p><em>Humour plays a crucial role in family discourse as it fosters emotional connection, diffuses tension, and promotes open communication by providing a light-hearted and relatable atmosphere. Extant studies on family discourse have focused on (im)politeness strategies and pragmatic markers. However, scant attention has been paid to the communicative functions of humour in family discourse. This study was, therefore, designed to investigate humour in Maryam Apaokagi’s comedy skits, to identify the types, their pragmatic functions, and how they contribute to the overall meaning of the discourse. Jacob Mey’s Pragmatic Acts Theory served as the theoretical framework. Data for the study comprised eight selected Maryam Apaokagi’s comedy skits, produced in Nigeria. The selection is based on their humorous reflections of family issues and subjected to pragmatic analysis. Findings reveal that pragmatic acts exist in four interlocutory contexts among family members: couple (husband-wife) relationship; sibling(s)-relationship; mother-child relationship; and distant-family relationship. The contexts are indexed by eight pragmatic acts and functions which underpin expressions of humour: warning to threaten the husband, promising to raise hopes, requesting to make a mockery of the elder brother, ordering to deliberately disrespect the elder sister, questioning to persuade and apologise indirectly, scolding to condemn a child’s inappropriate actions, exaggerating to boast and show off, speculating to impress the mother and indict the child. Employed with wit to avoid serious conflicts, these humorous acts were largely foregrounded by conversational, psychological and physical acts, and underscored by such contextual factors as inference, reference, relevance, and shared situation knowledge to humorously depict how family issues are variously handled.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/844 Humour based on flouting Grice’s conversational maxims in Ali Douagi’s "The Star-Gazer" 2024-06-26T15:07:26+02:00 Sondes Hamdi sondeshamdi@yahoo.fr <p><em>Attardo (1993) argues that humour in conversation is partly created by flouting or violating Grice’s Conversational Maxims. A few studies have probed the validity of this claim by investigating humour in literary texts (Amianna &amp; Putranti, 2017; Al-Zubeiry, 2020). However, to the best of our knowledge, not one study has probed this claim on the basis of a Tunisian literary text. Situated within the theoretical framework of Grice’s Cooperative Principle (henceforth CP), this qualitative and descriptive study tries to fill this gap, at least partially, by examining humour in dialogue in Ali Douagi’s short story “The Star-Gazer”. The text is based on an interactional dialogue between a man and a woman. The study’s results suggest that utterances in the dialogue in this story flout the Maxim of Quantity by giving too much or too little information to the hearer, and are found to flout the Maxim of Relation by stating things that are irrelevant to the topic of conversation. Utterances are found to flout the Maxim of Manner by stating things that are long, unclear and ambiguous, but no flouting of the Maxim of Quality is found. The humour in the text is found to be, at least partially, determined by flouting Grice’s Conversational Maxims. As such, the study corroborates the claim that humour in conversation is, partly, determined by flouting or violating Grice’s Conversational Maxims. It is argued that this work contributes to pragmatics, humour research and literary criticism.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/721 Humorous elements in virtual onymic creations 2024-06-26T15:07:34+02:00 Magdalena Kawęcka magdalena.kawecka@kul.pl <p><em>Informal use of anthroponymy is an integral part of the lexical resource of every language. The subject of this article is issues related to media onomastics (the review concerns terminology in internet forums). The aim of the article is the material exemplification of proper names, emphasising their formal features and ways of functioning on a specific communication plane. The task is to show certain tendencies and motivations in the field of creating virtual proper names in terms of their humorous value. In accordance with the adopted research perspective and the purpose of this article, when explaining the process of creating media onyms, reference was made to the mechanisms of name-forming derivation and the theory of humour, in particular the theory of incongruity. The specific communication channel creates new opportunities for language users and is an interesting research field for onomasts because, with the development of computer technology, the terminology began to go beyond the traditionally accepted standards.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/883 Humour in Macanese Creole literature as an identity creator and consolidator 2024-06-26T15:07:15+02:00 João Oliveira john.olivetree@gmail.com <p><em>Macanese Creole survives in literary works of the late 19<sup>th</sup> and 20<sup>th</sup> centuries. This paper explores comic literature</em>, <em>which</em> <em>constitutes the bulk of the existing corpus in this language, and analyses how this genre relates to the creation and maintenance of a Macanese identity represented as distinct from surrounding historically and demographically significant identities. I resort to the incongruity theory and to some relevant knowledge resources (script opposition, situation, target, and language) of the General Theory of Verbal Humour (Attardo and Raskin, 1991; Attardo 2001; 2008) to analyse how comic literature in Macanese fabricates a fictionalised and performative memory connected to the way in which the Macanese wish to see themselves and be seen by others.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/915 Wordplay-based humor 2024-06-26T15:07:06+02:00 Kateryna Pilyarchuk pilyarchuk@europa-uni.de <p><em>Translating humour is comparable to working with poetry: one has to make sacrifices for the sake of equivalence. The task is further complicated when humour is anchored in multiple communication channels, such as the verbal and visual ones. The data of this article is complete Season 5 of </em>The Simpsons<em> animated sitcom and its Ukrainian, Russian, and German translation versions. Selected instances from the larger corpus of 526 humorous acts are discussed in light of Attardo’s (2001) General Theory of Verbal Humour and Zabalbeascoa’s (1993) concept of faithfulness in translation. They are then evaluated according to Chiaro’s (2008) typology for wordplay translation, which is expanded with concrete techniques. The findings suggest that the translator’s creativity may play a more important role than the proximity between the source and target languages.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/880 Incorporating humour in the educational journey of young tourists 2024-06-26T15:07:19+02:00 Fatemeh Fehrest farima.fehrest@my.jcu.edu.au Jenny Panchal jenny.panchal@jcu.edu.au Anja Pabel a.pabel@cqu.edu.au Laurie Murphy laurie.murphy@jcu.edu.au <p><em>Humour for children has received attention from various academic domains. However, the topic is a less explored area in the field of tourism. Addressing this research gap, the present study aims to firstly, identify the main themes of humour which are discussed in the academic literature about children, and secondly to outline how the identified themes can be applied to children’s learning experiences in tourism settings. The study employs content analysis to systematically review 190 relevant publications from multidisciplinary fields sourced from ScienceDirect and Scopus. Five overarching themes were identified across studies of various disciplines: social, parents, play, teachers, and characters. The emerging themes were interpreted through the lens of Vygotsky’s Socio-Cultural Theory to develop a conceptual framework for children’s learning experiences in tourism contexts. The paper enhances our understanding of the children’s literature in the context of tourism by providing both theoretical and practical insights. It specifically focuses on how humour can be utilised to enrich children's learning in the realm of tourism.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/889 An investigation on the types of humour in English Language Teaching among Malaysian lecturers in higher education 2024-06-26T15:07:13+02:00 Arif Hakimi Zulazli arifhakimiupsi@gmail.com Mazlin Mohamed Mokhtar mazlin@fbk.upsi.edu.my Intan Safinas Mohd Ariff Albakri safinas@fbk.upsi.edu.my Mohd Haniff Mohd Tahir haniff.tahir@fbk.upsi.edu.my Puteri Zarina Megat Khalid puteri.zarina@fbk.upsi.edu.my Khazaila Zaini khazaila@fbk.upsi.edu.my <p><em>Humour in English Language Teaching (ELT) is known to be beneficial for both the educators and students. However, the literature addressing the types of humour used by Malaysian lecturers in higher education on this matter are yet to be explored. To address these issues, the study focusses to explore on the types of humour used in ELT by Malaysian lecturers in relation to the four types of humour: verbal, visual, auditory and figural humour. The research design is a qualitative study which implements two instruments; classroom observation and semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis will be used to analyse the data. The results from the study show that there are three types of humour commonly used: verbal humour, visual humour and auditory humour. The data analysis indicates that there are four factors which influence the types of humour used in the classroom: humour used for content delivery, humour to build rapport, humour to attract attention and humour to instil discipline. </em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/881 Humour Integrated Language Learning (HILL) 2024-06-26T15:07:17+02:00 Mohammad Ali Heidari-Shahreza maheidari.sh@gmail.com <p><em>There has been a notable surge in the studies on humour in the language classroom in the past two or even three decades. This burgeoning literature seems to have already entered the threshold of a field of study. In this article, humour-integrated language learning (HILL) is put forth as an umbrella term for diverse attempts to employ pedagogical humour in language education. HILL principally refers to a diverse suite of methods, tools and techniques where humour serves as a means (and/or an end) in language learning. It is envisaged that this paper can a) open a window on (L2) pedagogical humour in its diverse manifestations, b) underscore the potentiality latent in L2 humour to inform and influence language learning, c) present a more insightful, coherent picture of the attempts to use humour in language learning, and d) outline further developments and future directions in humour-informed research and practice within language education. This article also aims to broaden the borders of HILL by making connections between pedagogical (L2) humour and other relevant notions and approaches such as playful learning, creative pedagogy, critical pedagogy, technology-enhanced language learning (TELL), etc.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/902 Amoralism and jokes 2024-06-26T15:07:10+02:00 Jan Josl Jan.Josl@fhs.cuni.cz <div><em><span lang="EN-US">Is it possible to joke about everything? Are there topics that we should not joke about? Is it possible to say which jokes are good and which are wrong or are jokes simply beyond good and evil? This issue seems to be more pressing in today’s multicultural world. In this study I reason contrary to amoralism that there are some jokes that can be morally judged. In order to present my argument, I use the type and token distinction as well as the results of debate between Bartel and Cremaldi and Brandon Cooke’s arguments in the favour of amoralism in art in general. I argue that even though amoralism is right in the case of joke types as well as in the case of some joke tokens not all jokes are fictive utterances. Therefore, the study concludes that it is reasonable to morally assess certain joke utterances.</span></em></div> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/904 On the use of scale distortion for visual humour 2024-06-26T15:07:08+02:00 Clara Swaboda swaboda@logological.org Tristan Miller Tristan.Miller@umanitoba.ca <p><em>In contrast to verbal humour, visual humour remains a relatively underdeveloped area of research. In this exploratory study, we investigate whether scale incongruity – i.e., discrepancy between the expected and actual experience of the size of an object – can serve as a source of humour in the visual modality. We adapt a pre-existing visual data set of mundane scenes by altering the size of an individual object in each scene and collecting humorousness ratings from human annotators on the original and scale-distorted versions. Our analysis of these annotations reveals that scenes with distorted objects are perceived to be significantly funnier than the original images.</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/920 Book review 2024-02-29T17:53:00+01:00 Jan Chovanec chovanec@phil.muni.cz <p><em>Book review</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/923 Book review 2024-03-12T09:57:05+01:00 ‪Anastasiya Astapova anastasiya.ast@gmail.com <p><em>Book review</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/950 Book review 2024-05-27T14:52:00+02:00 Paolo Vanini paolovanini86@gmail.com <p><em>Book review</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research https://ww.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/917 Book review 2024-02-13T11:04:30+01:00 Massih Zekavat s.m.zekavat@rug.nl <p><em>Book review</em></p> 2024-06-26T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The European Journal of Humour Research